Long time no post!

Busy busy!  Now where did we leave off?  Oh yes good old James Cash Penney.  Here are some of the final illustrations for the story of his life, written by Jason Offut and published by Truman State University Press.

Young businessman J.C. Penney raising and selling pigs in his family's yard, much to the chagrin of neighbors.

Young businessman J.C. Penney raising and selling pigs in his family's yard, much to the chagrin of neighbors.

J.C. as a young man, working at the Golden Rule dry goods store in Wyoming.

J.C. as a young man, working at the Golden Rule dry goods store in Wyoming.

J.C also had an interest in raising prize winning livestock.  Now that I look at this illustration for the first time in awhile, I realize both the men look related or like the same guy.  Eesh.  

J.C also had an interest in raising prize winning livestock.  Now that I look at this illustration for the first time in awhile, I realize both the men look related or like the same guy.  Eesh.  

J.C. going over accounts while his wife does some canning.  Every penny had to count during the depression.

J.C. going over accounts while his wife does some canning.  Every penny had to count during the depression.

An older J.C. at a department store during the 50s.

An older J.C. at a department store during the 50s.

Andrew Taylor Still - Helping the wounded during the Civil War

This Illustration of A.T. Still shows him dressing the wound of an injured soldier at a Civil War field hospital.  This illustration is for the Notable Missourian book an Andrew Taylor Still, published by Truman State University Press.

Final Art

Final Art

Rough sketch

Rough sketch

Rough sketch   

Rough sketch

 

Andrew Taylor Still

Here is the first illustration for the Notable Missourian book on AT (Andrew Taylor) Still. He founded the school of Osteopathy.  What is Osteopathy?  Well this question illustrates why I like these Notable Missourian books so much...I learn from them!  I've always wondered what it meant when a doctor has DO by his or her name instead of MD.  Now I know It stands for Doctor of Osteopathy.  I'm pretty sure a lot of you are saying "No shit", but I had no idea. Anyways this first illustration shows AT Still as a child with his family watching his dad return a trip.  His dad was a traveling preacher.  

The Notable Missourian series is published by Truman State University Press. 

 

 

Ella Ewing at the Fair

This illustration for the Notable Missourian book on Ella Ewing (Truman State University Press) shows the Missouri giantess Ella Ewing as an attraction at a state fair.

Final Art

Final Art

Rough sketch....she was a little too big here.  I was approaching "Lord of the Rings" giant size.

Rough sketch....she was a little too big here.  I was approaching "Lord of the Rings" giant size.

Rough sketch with details honed in.

Rough sketch with details honed in.

Animated GIF showing the difference between the final art completed on the computer and the rough base hand painted on panel.

Animated GIF showing the difference between the final art completed on the computer and the rough base hand painted on panel.

Buck O'Neil gets the news about Jackie Robinson

Here's the Chapter 4 illustration for the Notable Missourian book on Buck O'Neil.

While Buck was serving in the Pacific he got the news about Jackie Robinson getting signed with the Brooklyn Dodgers.  Black players finally being "welcomed" into the major leagues was a big deal; it also meant the inevitable death of the Negro League which had become a celebrated contributor to black culture.  Still, Buck and most of the country was thrilled.  Finally, the best could play with the best.

This illustration is for the Notable Missourian book on Buck O'Neil, published by Truman State University Press.

Final Art

Final Art

Rough sketch

Rough sketch

Buck O'Neil with the Monarchs

Here's another illustration for the Notable Missourian book on Buck O'Neil (Truman State University Press).  This one shows Buck playing 1st base for the Kansas City Monarchs during the Negro League World Series against the Homestead Grays.  

Rough Sketch

Rough Sketch

Barnstorming Baseballers

This illustration is for chapter 2 of the Notable Missourian book on Buck O'Neil by Truman State University Press.  Many early Negro League teams would "barnstorm" small towns to play baseball against local company teams or other Negro League teams.  The towns loved this because they weren't often able to watch high caliber major league players, and in every sense the negro league players were exactly that.  It is still commonly believed that some of the best players to ever play baseball were likely in the negro leagues.

Anywho I'm on a tangent!  I've been on a Ken Burns kick and am smack in the middle of the Baseball series which dovetails nicely with this book about Buck O'Neil.  This illustration shows Buck and a bunch of his teammates driving to the next small Florida town where they have a game scheduled.  If one of the cars would break down, the guys would have to all cram into a single car to make it to their destination. Some of the guys would even stand on the running boards and ride on the outside of the car! Now that's dedication.

Rough Sketch

Rough Sketch

Buck O'Neil!

Here's some more Notable Missourian artwork for a book on baseball legend Buck O'Neil (published by Truman State University Press).  This illustration shows young Buck and some friends watching a baseball game through a fence.  

Final Art

Final Art

Approved rough sketch.  I ended up moving the fence and the ball field up for the final art.

Approved rough sketch.  I ended up moving the fence and the ball field up for the final art.

Alternate rough sketch

Alternate rough sketch

Another alternate sketch   

Another alternate sketch

 

William Clark chapter 2 illustration

Here's the art for the 2nd chapter of the Notable Missourian book (Truman State University Press) on William Clark.

William Clark, Meriwether Lewis and their interpreter, Sacagawea, meet with Native American tribes on their journey up the Missouri.

William Clark, Meriwether Lewis and their interpreter, Sacagawea, meet with Native American tribes on their journey up the Missouri.

Original rough sketch

Original rough sketch

Alternate rough sketch

Alternate rough sketch

Another alternate rough sketch showing the Discovery being pulled along the Missouri, as William Clark prepares to meet the local natives.  In hindsight there are many things wrong with this illustration even as a sketch.

Another alternate rough sketch showing the Discovery being pulled along the Missouri, as William Clark prepares to meet the local natives.  In hindsight there are many things wrong with this illustration even as a sketch.

William Clark Chapter 1 GIF

Okay, I know animated GIFs can be annoying but what the hell.  Here is one that gives an idea of  the process and edits that go into some of these Notable Missourian illustrations.   This illustration is for the book on William Clark (Published by Truman State University Press).  Here a young Clark is shown hunting with his slave and contemporary, York.  York would later accompany Clark on his trip across the continent to explore the Louisiana Purchase and search for a Northwest Passage.

Albert Bond Lambert and Charles Lindbergh

This illustration is for the Notable MIssourian book on Albert Bond Lambert by Christopher Lynch and published by Truman State University Press.

Albert Bond Lambert was one of the first investors to help Charles Lindbergh finance his famous aircraft, The Spirit of St Louis.  By investing early and investing a lot, Lambert made it easier for Lindbergh to attract other investors as well.  Its old hat nowadays but back then LIndbergh's attempt at a non-stop solo flight across the atlantic - something that had never been done - was akin to a moonshot.

Rough Sketch

Rough Sketch


Albert Bond Lambert

Here are the first two illustrations for the Notable Missourian book on Albert Bond Lambert. The Notable Missourian books are published by Truman State University Press. This book (on Albert Bond Lambert) was written by Christopher Lynch.

Albert Bond Lambert was an Olympic golfer, an adventurer, and perhaps most importantly a strong supporter and benefactor to early aviation. Here are the first two chapter header illustrations showing young Albert, One shows him as a young golfer (He was on the U.S. olympic team) and the other shows Albert riding through France on an early motorcycle. Albert loved motorcylces, but that love was soon replaced by aviation.

Albert riding an early motorcycle through the french countryside

Albert riding an early motorcycle through the french countryside

rough sketch

rough sketch

rough sketch   

rough sketch

 


Young Jeffrey Deroine - a gifted communicator

This was my favorite Notable Missourian book to illustrate out of the 2015 series.  Jeffrey Deroine was a fascinating guy.  Born a slave, Jeffrey had a natural gift for language.  As a teen he was owned by a fur trapper who used Jeffrey's communication skills to negotiate trades with native peoples such as the Ioway tribe.  Starting with simple exchanges such as these, Jeffrey and the Ioway would form a strong friendship.  A friendship that would ultimately help Jeffrey to become a free man, travel the world, and own property - very rare things for a former slave during the early 19th century.  

This illustration is for the Notable Missourian book on Jeffrey Deroine, published by Truman State University Press.

Young Jeffrey Deroine interpreting for his fur-trapper master.

Young Jeffrey Deroine interpreting for his fur-trapper master.



The Phonz, Chapter 2

This is the Chapter 2 illustration for Notable Missourian Alphonso Wetmore.  Its a bit busy, but as my editor said, "War is busy".  I think I might be paraphrasing that badly, but still it seems accurate.

Anyways the subject of this is the The Battle of Queenston Heights, a pivotal battle in the War of 1812.  

The Notable Missourian book about Alphonso Wetmore written by Mary Barile and published by Truman State University Press.

Rough sketch of an alternate version

Rough sketch of an alternate version

Alphonso Wetmore Chapter 1

 

Alphonso is another Notable Missourian to be featured in the Truman State University Press series by the same name (Notable Missourians). This book was written by Mary Barile.

Alphonso was a veteran of the war of 1812, a leader of expeditions on the Santa Fe Trail and an all around adventurer.  Even better, he was a good story teller too.  I suppose one has to live up to a name like Alphonso.  I can't even imagine anybody named Alphonso being a couch potato.  Heck, when naming my kids, I kind of wish I would've thought about the name Alphonso.  Alphonso Hare.  Yeah, lucky for them that never crossed my mind.

This illustration shows young Alphonso studying hard in his families cabin.  Alphonso was smart and curious even at a young age.

 

Original rough sketch showing evening life in the Wetmore cabin.

Original rough sketch showing evening life in the Wetmore cabin.

Alternate rough sketch showing the tension between the new settlers and the Native Americans.

Alternate rough sketch showing the tension between the new settlers and the Native Americans.

Another sketch illustrating the tension.

Another sketch illustrating the tension.

And another.

And another.

Wing Walker

Here is another illustration for Truman State University Press book on Notable Missourian Maria Meyer Fower (Written by Christine Montgomery).  Here she is shown climbing out onto the wing of her JN-4 Jenny.  A common thing for her, but this time was different.  They were flying through downtown St Louis on a particularly gusty day while attempting to whip up crowds for a show.  The intense wind made it harrowing enough that the pilot cut it short and returned to the open air in short order.  

Final Art

Final Art

Rough Sketch

Rough Sketch

Alternative Rough Sketch   

Alternative Rough Sketch

 

Barnstormstress

I made that word up.  Its kind of a cool word methinks, but I suspect anything made feminine by adding "stress" to the end is understandably pejorative.  I mean you're adding the word stress to something to a title to denote its a woman!  Sheesh.  All that said, if there's one word I think could easily have stress woven in to it its barnstormer.  Hmmm Is that one word or two?  Anyways, ironically I don't think stress was part of Marie Meyer Fowers vocabulary when it came to anything flight related, it was her love and she was incredible at it.  Here is an illustration of her after jumping from another JN-4 Jenny while impressing a gathered crowd.

This illustration is for the Notable Missourian book on Marie Meyer Fower written by Christine Montgomery and published by Truman State University Press.

Finished art

Finished art

Initial rough sketch   

Initial rough sketch