George Caleb Bingham

Recently I made some illustrations for the Notable Missourian book on the painter George Caleb Bingham.  He was an interesting man in both art and politics.

Young George sits and watches Chester Harding paint a portrait of Daniel Boone.  His love of art was now official.

Young George sits and watches Chester Harding paint a portrait of Daniel Boone.  His love of art was now official.

George went east to study the works in the big museums there.

George went east to study the works in the big museums there.

George was passionate about the plight of the people, and got deeply into politics.

George was passionate about the plight of the people, and got deeply into politics.

Not only did George enjoy politics, but he used it as a subject of many of his works.

Not only did George enjoy politics, but he used it as a subject of many of his works.

George as an elder teaching a painting class.

George as an elder teaching a painting class.

Andrew Taylor Still teaching

This illustration shows an older Andrew Taylor (A.T.) Still watching over a class being taught at his newly founded school of Osteopathy.  This illustration is for the Notable Missourian series published by Truman State University Press.

Final art

Final art

Rough sketch.  You can see quite a few changes were made.

Rough sketch.  You can see quite a few changes were made.

Andrew Taylor Still

Here is the first illustration for the Notable Missourian book on AT (Andrew Taylor) Still. He founded the school of Osteopathy.  What is Osteopathy?  Well this question illustrates why I like these Notable Missourian books so much...I learn from them!  I've always wondered what it meant when a doctor has DO by his or her name instead of MD.  Now I know It stands for Doctor of Osteopathy.  I'm pretty sure a lot of you are saying "No shit", but I had no idea. Anyways this first illustration shows AT Still as a child with his family watching his dad return a trip.  His dad was a traveling preacher.  

The Notable Missourian series is published by Truman State University Press. 

 

 

Ella Ewing at the Fair

This illustration for the Notable Missourian book on Ella Ewing (Truman State University Press) shows the Missouri giantess Ella Ewing as an attraction at a state fair.

Final Art

Final Art

Rough sketch....she was a little too big here.  I was approaching "Lord of the Rings" giant size.

Rough sketch....she was a little too big here.  I was approaching "Lord of the Rings" giant size.

Rough sketch with details honed in.

Rough sketch with details honed in.

Animated GIF showing the difference between the final art completed on the computer and the rough base hand painted on panel.

Animated GIF showing the difference between the final art completed on the computer and the rough base hand painted on panel.

Ella Ewing

This illustration is for the Notable Missourian book (Truman State University Press) on Ella Ewing. Ella was a giant hailing from Missouri.  I'm not sure if calling someone a "giant" is politically correct, but it seems like one of those words that can't be used in a diminishing way.  Well I guess when you use it as an adjective it definitely can be used to diminish.  Like "Fred is a giant @#$&#%$".  But! as noun its hard to imagine that it would be offensive.  That said what do I know?!  

Okay, forgive me that tangent.  This illustration shows a young Ella and her parents visiting Chicago for the first time. Ella's parents were initially reluctant to accept any of the offers to "display" her at fairs or the circus, but the money was good and Ella thought it would be an opportunity to travel and meet new people.  Her parents ultimately agreed so long as they could travel with her, no doubt to look out for her.

Ella and her parents disembarking from a street car in Chicago ~ 1890

Ella and her parents disembarking from a street car in Chicago ~ 1890

Original rough sketch.  I thought the view was pulled back a bit to far.  Was afraid the people would get lost.

Original rough sketch.  I thought the view was pulled back a bit to far.  Was afraid the people would get lost.

A tightened rough sketch with a closer view of the street car.  I was mainly thinking the street car would be a good device to show the relative sizes of the people.  

A tightened rough sketch with a closer view of the street car.  I was mainly thinking the street car would be a good device to show the relative sizes of the people.  

Buck O'Neil gets the news about Jackie Robinson

Here's the Chapter 4 illustration for the Notable Missourian book on Buck O'Neil.

While Buck was serving in the Pacific he got the news about Jackie Robinson getting signed with the Brooklyn Dodgers.  Black players finally being "welcomed" into the major leagues was a big deal; it also meant the inevitable death of the Negro League which had become a celebrated contributor to black culture.  Still, Buck and most of the country was thrilled.  Finally, the best could play with the best.

This illustration is for the Notable Missourian book on Buck O'Neil, published by Truman State University Press.

Final Art

Final Art

Rough sketch

Rough sketch

Buck O'Neil with the Monarchs

Here's another illustration for the Notable Missourian book on Buck O'Neil (Truman State University Press).  This one shows Buck playing 1st base for the Kansas City Monarchs during the Negro League World Series against the Homestead Grays.  

Rough Sketch

Rough Sketch