Rivercene

After some rough starts, Joseph Kinney ended up doing quite well for himself in the steamboat business.  He built a mansion for his family just across the Missouri River from Boonville.  The mansion was playfully called Rivercene by Joseph and his wife Matilda as a pun playing off the fact that the river can be seen from the house and the house can be seen from the river. Rivercene still stands today and it remains a striking building unlike any other in the area.  

This artwork is for the Notable Missourian book on Joseph Kinney, written by Maryellen McVicker and published by Truman State University Press.


Steam Boat Race

This illustration for the Notable Missourian book on Joseph Kinney saw some changes since the most recent composition sketch.  Mainly, I changed the angle of the steam ships so it looked more like they were passing by instead of heading right for the poor spectators.  I also changed the POV of the ships to make it appear as though the crowd is on higher ground instead of near the shore line. Below is the final illustration along with some of the original composition sketches for this chapter.

This artwork is for the Notable Missourian book on Joseph Kinney, written by Maryellen McVicker and published by Truman State University Press.

Final illustration of steamboat race

Final illustration of steamboat race

Final composition sketch showing steamboat race 

Final composition sketch showing steamboat race 

An early idea sketch for this chapter showing the race from inside the wheelhouse.  I still like the potential of this one.

An early idea sketch for this chapter showing the race from inside the wheelhouse.  I still like the potential of this one.

An early rough sketch.  Hell I'm not sure why I'm including this one.  It doesn't look like a race or anything really.  It more looks like some knucklehead just hanging out with his lady and waving a flag while ships pass by.

An early rough sketch.  Hell I'm not sure why I'm including this one.  It doesn't look like a race or anything really.  It more looks like some knucklehead just hanging out with his lady and waving a flag while ships pass by.


Joseph Kinney's Shoe Store

The illustration of Joseph Kinney working in his Boonville shoe store unexpectedly turned out to be one of my favorites from this story.  I just really like the atmosphere.  

Below is the final art along with the original composition sketch and the revised composition sketch.  This artwork is for the Notable Missourian book on Joseph Kinney, written by Maryellen McVicker and published by Truman State University Press.

Final illustration

Final illustration

Revised and tightened composition sketch

Revised and tightened composition sketch

Original composition sketch

Original composition sketch

Joseph Kinney comp sketches

Here are a few new composition sketches for the Notable Missourian book on Joseph Kinney. Joseph Kinney was a 19th century steamboat mogul who spent most of his life in Boonville, Missouri.  I call him a mogul but honestly I'm not sure what mogul means. I think I'll look that up.

These sketches are for the Notable Missourian book on Joseph Kinney, written by Maryellen McVicker and published by Truman State University Press.

Joseph Kinney as a teen working on a dock while watching an early river steamboat pass by.

Joseph Kinney as a teen working on a dock while watching an early river steamboat pass by.

Joseph Kinney's investment in a flatboat ended in disaster when the boat sank.

Joseph Kinney's investment in a flatboat ended in disaster when the boat sank.

Joseph Kinney opened a shoe store in Boonville. While working there he met his second wife, Matilda.  Business was good and he accrued enough money to return to his passion, steamboats.

Joseph Kinney opened a shoe store in Boonville. While working there he met his second wife, Matilda.  Business was good and he accrued enough money to return to his passion, steamboats.

A steamboat race on the Missouri River.  Who wouldn't love a steamboat race?

A steamboat race on the Missouri River.  Who wouldn't love a steamboat race?

An aerial view of old Boonville showing Joseph Kinney's mansion, Riverscene, on the north side of the Missouri.

An aerial view of old Boonville showing Joseph Kinney's mansion, Riverscene, on the north side of the Missouri.

This one won't be used but it amused my inner cartoonist.  Here he's posing for his portrait painting by George Caleb Bingham and he can't help getting excited and breaking his pose when he sees a steamboat passing by on the river.

This one won't be used but it amused my inner cartoonist.  Here he's posing for his portrait painting by George Caleb Bingham and he can't help getting excited and breaking his pose when he sees a steamboat passing by on the river.

Sam Nightingale loading a flatboat on the Missouri

I really enjoyed making this one.  It makes me look forward to the Joseph Kinney finals where there will be a lot of river scenes.

The first three books of the Notable Missourian series by Truman State University Press are at the printer now.  Two of them may even be complete.  I cannot wait to see how the actual books turn out!   

GuineaSam_Booneville_web.jpg

Guinea Sam sketch examples

Here are some examples of the Guinea Sam comp sketches.  Researching materials for the illustration of this book has lead me down some fascinating rabbit holes.  (fascinating rabbit holes?)  I've really enjoyed making these and I look forward to the final art.  

(These sketches are for the Notable Missourian book series to be published by Truman State University Press)

Guinea Sam as a young boy captured and sold to slave traders in his native Guinea

Guinea Sam as a young boy captured and sold to slave traders in his native Guinea

Guinea Sam as a slave on a rice plantation in South Carolina

Guinea Sam as a slave on a rice plantation in South Carolina

After working on a sugar cane plantation in Louisiana, Guinea Sam was sold to a man from Boonville Missouri. There he tended an apple orchard.

After working on a sugar cane plantation in Louisiana, Guinea Sam was sold to a man from Boonville Missouri. There he tended an apple orchard.

This is an alternate approach for Guinea Sam in Boonville. I like the scene better but the figure is not great. Guineas Sam was freed at the end of the civil war. He stayed in Boonville for the rest of his life as a gardner, storyteller, and conjure man.

This is an alternate approach for Guinea Sam in Boonville. I like the scene better but the figure is not great. Guineas Sam was freed at the end of the civil war. He stayed in Boonville for the rest of his life as a gardner, storyteller, and conjure man.

Guinea Sam using his conjuring to lift a curse

Guinea Sam using his conjuring to lift a curse

A family refused to put Guineas Sam up for the night, so he hexed them by telling them that before the end of the night they would be driven from their home. That night there was a big storm and what sounds like a ball lightening incident. The timing is awesomely spooky.

A family refused to put Guineas Sam up for the night, so he hexed them by telling them that before the end of the night they would be driven from their home. That night there was a big storm and what sounds like a ball lightening incident. The timing is awesomely spooky.

Guinea Sam as an older man mixing herbs and traditional folk remedies.

Guinea Sam as an older man mixing herbs and traditional folk remedies.